Hello Editsuite.com friends,

Due to tons of abuse, we now require that you request user access by sending us your Login, Name, Email Address, Phone Number, and Profession by submitting that info HERE.  I'll review your request and try to get back to you within the week.  You can't imagine how many folk want to trash forums with bogas advertising. 

Also, please help us gain enough Facebook "Likes" to have a custom Facebook URL!  

--Gary Lieberman

Sony 8000 3-Day Operation Classroom Training

7 replies [Last post]
jeffreyabr
User offline. Last seen 1 year 46 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 14 Jul 2012

For a while now, I've been tempted to take one of the Sony 8000 training courses that are offered through Sony directly.

 

https://www.servicesplus.sel.sony.com/sony-training-catalog-2.aspx?minca...

 

They seem to cover everything, top-to-bottom, but to the tune of $1,800.

 

I've been working as a Viz/Chyron Op in some NYC shops for the last year or so since I graduated college, but I thought this might jump-start my potential to actually land some kind of TD gig.

 

Does anybody have any experience with these? Are they worth the cost?  Is it worth it in an employer's eyes to have gone through one of these courses?

 

Any input here is helpful!

hosko
hosko's picture
User offline. Last seen 2 days 21 hours ago. Offline
Joined: 24 Aug 2008

Like the others have said it might be cheaper to becomes friends, buy beer or a meal for one of the TD's you already work with who might show you around the switcher. When I first started I bought the training DVD off Sony which also helped me learn the Engineering menus. I was lucky though in that I was a full timer and had access to the studios in the down time. Personally I have always looked favourably in hiring someone who has made an effort to do things in their own time to better themselves.

 

 

There is Global training of how a switcher works then there is the local training of how a particular shop does things. For instance some might use P-Bus to control a Spotbox others might use VDCP. Even experienced TD's need training for jobs at places they haven't worked before. Normally there is more then one way to do something on a switcher however some of those ways will not work unless A,B & C happens first. During a live show if X,Y & Z happens you're toast. This is as important as knowing which buttons to press.

jeffreyabr
User offline. Last seen 1 year 46 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 14 Jul 2012

Read my mind on the beer or a meal, haha. Did offer, but they didn't accept and just wanted to teach out of the kindness of their heart.

I have the Menus Emulator and this PowerPoint-esque thing from a TD friend, but I always found the emulator tough to learn from if you can't understand how it effects anything.

That's a very good point about the general utility of the switcher versus how it will be used in any given shop. I was just hoping to find a good foundation upon which I could walk into an environment and be prepared to understand how they have it set up. I think the person giving me some lessons currently is setting me on the path to be able to do that. I'm fortunate enough to be learning in the same shop that I am working, so that will hopefully work to my advantage.

hosko
hosko's picture
User offline. Last seen 2 days 21 hours ago. Offline
Joined: 24 Aug 2008

People knock back free beer hmmmmmm I'm not sure I would trust said person :)

Matt Saplin
User offline. Last seen 23 weeks 6 days ago. Offline
Joined: 29 Oct 2005

I agree with Bob -- there are things you can do to learn on your own, and you'll be better off keeping that money in your pocket.


What are the chances you could spend some time learning from one of the TDs at a shop you're already working in?  You'd be able to get the basics down, and could likely learn about the effects your shop uses.  At the same time, poke-around Youtube a bit -- there are some short tutorials and switcher dog & pony shows that might get you familiar with the concepts, terminology, and offerings of the product line.  After you're comfortable, I'd suggest dissecting some effects your shop uses, and work on rebuilding them -- you'll learn about the switcher, and will have people around you who can answer questions as you encounter new territory.

Keep in mind that there isn't just one way of doing anything, try not to let that confuse you.  It sounds to me like you're interested in really understanding the switcher -- once you learn the concepts and increase your knowledge, you'll have an easier time building up the skills and muscle memory to switch shows.

I hope that helps.  Good luck, and keep us posted!
Matt

jeffreyabr
User offline. Last seen 1 year 46 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 14 Jul 2012

Thanks for the input Matt. Small world running into you on here - this is Jeff from graphics at MSNBC.

I started doing some training on the weekends with the TD on hand after we finish those shows at 2pm and have cut-ins. I've gotten some great lessons so far, in much more relevant (since it's my shop) and digestable quantities than I'm sure 3 days of 9-5 training would have provided.

I'm excited to keep working at it. Hope to see you around some time!

Bob Ennis
User offline. Last seen 3 days 6 hours ago. Offline
Joined: 24 Aug 2005

The employers that I am aware of are far more concerned about your actual level of experience that if you have taken a factory course.  It's the traditional Catch-22 scenario.

That being said, I am a big proponent that for an operations course on ANY switcher, you first check the credentials of the person teaching the course.  If that person is not a TD, then in my opinion, you are wasting your time.  Anyone can teach you what the buttons do - it takes someone who can actually switch a show to be able to teach you HOW and WHEN to use those buttons.

If you can somehow arrange to observe a TD working in the environment that you are interested in pursuing, you will learn more in a few hours than you will in 3 or 5 days of class.  Again, just my opinion.

Bob Ennis

jeffreyabr
User offline. Last seen 1 year 46 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 14 Jul 2012

Thanks Bob. That's exactly the kind of reply I wanted to confirm what I'd thought.

The thing I love most about the Sony is its versatility, so I was a bit scared that learning solely from someone in my shop would result in learning only how they do it in that specific shop. I made friends with a freelancer who's a heck of a TD, and she has been kind enough to start showing me around the switcher, stopping at each function to provide me with the multiple methods of doing the same task. During the week, our place is pretty hectic, but Sundays are one of my regular days, so that has actually become a prime occasion for me to get some time at the board.